Wildlife

Fallow Deer were introduced to the Park many centuries ago and are depicted on the Park map of 1711. Although not fenced in, they are very much “hefted” to the Park and the adjoining Amerside Forest. The does spend most of the year in and around the Park and are often spotted during tours. The bucks tend to wander further but draw back into the Park for the rut in the autumn. In October, the roaring bucks add to the bellowing bulls to provide a slightly prehistoric soundscape. 

Chillingham Park is a wonderful habitat for roe deer as well as the fallow deer. There were once red deer in the Park but they disappeared during the 1st World War. There are over 50 species of birds including woodpeckers, redstart, nuthatch, and other birds of ancient parkland. Cuckoos can be heard in the spring and many woodcock visit in the winter. The badgers are very nocturnal and not often seen, but they tend to forage in daylight in very dry periods. You are quite likely to see brown hares and foxes.

And you must watch out for the native red squirrels. Until recently, the Castle grounds and Chillingham Park were one of their Northumbrian strongholds and they were seen on a regular basis. Sadly, recently the non-native grey squirrel has invaded the area despite our best efforts. They have displaced the native reds but they are still present in Amerside Forest and are occasionally seen around the Park.

The oldest trees in Chillingham Park are ancient alder trees. These were hundreds of years old when they were cut down to stumps, in the 1750s. They have regrown since. Beech and oak trees date from the 1790s onwards, and in Victorian times, the magnificent firs, spruces and redwoods of the Castle grounds were planted. The pastures have a great diversity of flowers and other plants.

During your visit, the warden will explain how the landscape of Chillingham was created and maintained over the centuries, as a uniquely special place for the Wild Cattle.

Fallow Deer were introduced to the Park many centuries ago and are depicted on the Park map of 1711. Although not fenced in, they are very much “hefted” to the Park and the adjoining Amerside Forest. The does spend most of the year in and around the Park and are often spotted during tours. The bucks tend to wander further but draw back into the Park for the rut in the autumn. In October, the roaring bucks add to the bellowing bulls to provide a slightly prehistoric soundscape. 

Chillingham Park is a wonderful habitat for roe deer as well as the fallow deer. There were once red deer in the Park but they disappeared during the 1st World War. There are over 50 species of birds including woodpeckers, redstart, nuthatch, and other birds of ancient parkland. Cuckoos can be heard in the spring and many woodcock visit in the winter. The badgers are very nocturnal and not often seen, but they tend to forage in daylight in very dry periods. You are quite likely to see brown hares and foxes.

And you must watch out for the native red squirrels. Until recently, the Castle grounds and Chillingham Park were one of their Northumbrian strongholds and they were seen on a regular basis. Sadly, recently the non-native grey squirrel has invaded the area despite our best efforts. They have displaced the native reds but they are still present in Amerside Forest and are occasionally seen around the Park.

The oldest trees in Chillingham Park are ancient alder trees. These were hundreds of years old when they were cut down to stumps, in the 1750s. They have regrown since. Beech and oak trees date from the 1790s onwards, and in Victorian times, the magnificent firs, spruces and redwoods of the Castle grounds were planted. The pastures have a great diversity of flowers and other plants.

During your visit, the warden will explain how the landscape of Chillingham was created and maintained over the centuries, as a uniquely special place for the Wild Cattle.